Dangers of Date Rape Drugs and Teenagers

 

date rape drug in a drink

Date rape drugs refer to certain drugs that are sometimes used to assist in committing a sexual assault. Sexual assault is defined as any type of nonconsensual sexual activity or contact. The Office on Women’s Health (OASH) asserts, “sexual assault can happen through physical force or threats of force or if the attacker gave the victim drugs or alcohol as part of the assault…[it] includes rape and sexual coercion.” Teenagers are notorious for pushing boundaries, testing limits, acting impulsively, and experimentation. Adolescence is a time in a young persons life to try new things and indulge curiosity. Moreover, teenagers endure rapid and exponential psychological, physical, emotional and developmental maturation processes that all occur simultaneously. Though to be expected, experimenting with drugs and/ or alcohol as a teen can play a role in date rapes. 

Types Of Date Rape Drugs

The three most common types of date rape drugs are ketamine, Rohypnol and GHB (Gamma-hydroxybutyrate). Each drug is slightly different and when one of the three is used, it can produce distinct effects on the victim. It is also important to keep in mind that every teen is different and each will likely experience a unique combination of symptoms. Illinois Department of Public Health provide the following examples of common effects and symptoms that can present with date rape drugs, respectively:

  • GHB, also known as G and Liquid Ecstasy, comes in the form of a colorless and odorless liquid, a white powder or a pill. Possible symptoms include:
    • Nausea
    • Drowsiness
    • Seizures
    • Dizziness
    • Slow heart rate
    • Coma
    • Inability to remember what happened while drugged
    • Death 
  • Rohypnol, also known as Roofies, comes in the form of a pill that dissolves in liquid. Possible symptoms include:
    • Sleepiness
    • Nausea
    • Loss of consciousness
    • Lower blood pressure
    • Visual disturbances
    • Problems talking
    • Muscle relaxation or loss of muscle control
    • Inability to remember what happened while drugged
  • Ketamine, also known as Special K and K, comes in the form of a tasteless, odorless white powder. Possible symptoms include:
    • Convulsions
    • Agitation
    • Loss of consciousness 
    • Aggressive and/ or violent behavior
    • Hallucinations
    • Lost sense of time and identity
    • Loss of coordination
    • Potentially fatal respiratory failure

Although most teenagers perceive themselves as invincible, young people are often naïve and overly trusting which can make them appear to an attacker as easy targets. Teenagers must remain hyper vigilant, especially in situations where drugs and/ or alcohol are involved.

For Information and Support

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Our admissions team is available to answer any general questions regarding mental health issues, treatment, and/or specific questions about the program at Pacific Teen Treatment and how we might be able to help your family. We can be reached by phone 24/7 at 800-531-5769. You can also contact us via email at info@pacificrtc.com.